Tag Archives: slang

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Humphrey’s Tiny Adventure: Remastered

Last year I participated in my first game jam with Ludum Dare #23. The result of those 48 hours was Humphrey’s Tiny Adventure, which I’ve written about previously. I was really proud of what I was able to accomplish, but there was a lot that I wanted to do with the project that I didn’t have time for. I didn’t include any sound or music, and I didn’t have anyone test it before release, so I never had the chance to get feedback. I recently decided to give Humphrey a long-overdue makeover for one of my entries in OneGameAMonth.

Over the past three weeks I’ve rewritten every piece of code in the game. Looking back at the original code, I’m literally terrified at the prospect of dealing with it. For the most part the gameplay is nothing complex, so I was able to build on the engine I wrote for Hypothermia. I created a data-driven cutscene scripting system using Slang, which I wrote about here. This was immensely helpful both in terms of writing reusable code and iterating quickly on the way each scene played out.

I’ve also redone almost all of the artwork. The art in the original version of Humphrey was composed entirely of large colored squares. This was mainly due to time constraints; the abstract style allowed me to spend very little time on each asset while still conveying the desired meaning. For the remake I did away with this restriction, and I’m very happy with the results. As usual, I used Inkscape for all the art.

Finally, this release includes a fantastic soundtrack by Chris Logsdon. It was composed specifically for the game, and you can download it here in high quality for the price of your choice.

Download the game here! I’d love to hear what you think of it!

Data-driven action scheduling in Flash

One of recent experiments in game development has been to orient my workflow away from code and towards data. When I use Flash, I’ve started using Ogmo Editor to design my levels, XML to handle settings, and Slang to handle game logic whenever possible. As a result, a lot of the code I’ve written recently can be easily reused across projects, and my classes are systemic and steer clear of situation-specific behavior. It’s been quite fulfilling and has done wonders for my iteration time; the focus on data instead of code means that I can take advantage of live-reloading for nearly every aspect of development. It’s not uncommon for me to work for an hour without ever closing my game, as I can simply reload all assets and data with the press of a button.

Today I’ve been working on Humphrey’s Tiny Adventure: Remastered, a post-compo version of my first 48 hour game. There are a number of places in the game where I need to set up events on a timeline, which I’ve done a few times already (see here and here), and each time I used some variation of traversal over a queue of function closures. While this approach worked well enough, it was tedious to set up and a pain to debug, not to mention the fact that it was anything but systemic. The most criticized aspect of the Ludum Dare version of Humphrey was that the intro cutscene was too long, and I agree. I think I knew that even before I released the game, but there was no way I was diving into that code to change it.

For Humphrey: Remastered, I was determined to achieve the same type of event scheduling in a data-driven way. Thanks to Slang, I was able to do just that. Here are the scripts for a scene I’ve been testing that involve two actors; Humphrey and Abe. This won’t be in the finished game, but it’s a good demonstration of the system’s capabilities.

Actions are called sequentially by the actor that the script is attached to. Each action block defines a set of statements that will be run as the events are executed. Calling done moves to the next action, and delay causes the actor to stop executing actions for the given number of seconds.

The give-cue and await-cue functions allow actors to pass messages between each other. In the above example, Humphrey give a cue to tell that he’s finished a set of actions, and Abe, who has been waiting for that cue, executes his final action in response.

There are only a few control functions involved, but so far the system has proven to be very powerful, and more than capable enough for the needs of this project. With the addition of message passing and response, specialized actor classes will be able to define custom behaviors while allowing the system to remain pure.

I’m quite happy with the way this has turned out. It’s fun to experiment with what can be done with Slang even in its current, quite minimal state.

 

 

Slang 2.0

I’ve recently been working on Slang, my scripting language for Flash, and yesterday I accidentally rewrote the entire thing. I started out refactoring of the parser, and ended up completely redesigning the way the language is executed.

The biggest internal change is that source must now be compiled before execution. This allows for a performance boost when running scripts multiple times, as the bytecode can be cached. Compiling is still quite fast, though, so it’s just as easy to use Slang in a dynamic way, such as an in-game console.

Another feature in this version is the introduction of Scopes. A Scope is a simple data structure which contains statements and can be executed by the application. Currently, they are used for conditional statements.

In the future, they will also allow closures and script functions.

With the addition of Scopes, the use of semicolons as artificial separators is no longer necessary, and they have therefore been removed from the language keyword set.

With this release I’ve moved Slang out of FLAKit and into its own repository. You can follow it here.