Category Archives: My games

Iridescence mobile development update

When I was at the Boston Festival of Indie Games with Iridescence, I’d tell anyone who asked about the mobile versions that they were about two or three weeks out. At the time I had every reason to believe that to be the case, but it turned out to be a little more complicated than I had anticipated.

This will be a moderately technical post, so the short version: Iridescence is still coming out on mobile devices (iOS, Android, and even Windows 8 phones), but it won’t be as soon as I had hoped.

Now onto the technical side of things.

Iridescence is written in Haxe, which is a language that aims to act as an intermediary between platforms. Instead of writing C++ for desktop platforms, Java for Android, Objective C for iOS, and C# for Windows phone, Haxe allows you to write in one language for all platforms, translating itself into the one that’s best supported by each target. On top of Haxe comes OpenFL, a framework that mimics the Flash API but has support for OpenGL and runs as a native application. A single codebase, a familiar API, and great performance? Almost sounds too good to be true.

It is.

A week before launch, I plugged in my Android tablet to get a build running. It had been my intention to have a tablet on the exhibition table so people could see the game running on a variety of platforms. I’d had it working in the past without any issues and without having to change a single line of code, so I expected it to be uneventful.

It wasn't.

It wasn’t.

I’m at a total loss to explain what’s going on. At first I thought it was just a matter of the renderer acting up, but the music doesn’t start either. Worse, I get this same behavior if the app is entirely empty. Other games work just fine, so it’s not a problem with the device. On my friend’s brand new Moto X nothing displays at all, so it’s not a matter of the tablet being below required specifications.

I’ve spoken to the OpenFL community and development team to no avail. A new beta version of the framework came out and had the same problem. Worst of all, I tried to roll back to an earlier version that had worked before and I couldn’t even compile. The OpenFL ecosystem is in a constant state of flux, with new build toolchains and dependencies popping up seemingly every time it updates, and the older (working) versions weren’t compatible with the new tools.

At this point it was time to start considering my options.

  • I could hunker down, wait for another OpenFL release, and hope that it would solve my problems.
  • Or I could bite the bullet and port the whole game back to C# (the language I wrote the original gamejam version in) and use Unity.

I’m choosing Unity. I’ll be using the Futile framework, partially because the API is Flash-inspired and will be easier to translate code between, but mainly because it’s a fully code-oriented workflow and only has support for 2D. When I first started working on the improved version of Iridescence Unity still didn’t have support for Linux and doing 2D work was a hassle. Not so any more. When I’m finished, this version will replace the current Windows/Mac/Linux Haxe-based one.

It’ll be a tough road but I’m ready to do what it takes. I leave you with the first step.

long road

Iridescence development visualized

Three name changes, three frameworks, and 33,697 lines of code and data — this video represents 11 months of nearly solo development at the rate of two days per second.

Each dot is a file, and each cluster represents a folder. Green lines represent new files being created, yellow for modifications, and red for deletions. Source code settles out at the bottom left, with level files top right. Audio is up on top near the levels, with an equal number of .oggs and .mp3s to support multiple platforms.

Towards the end it’s obvious that a lot of work is being done on level design, with scattered changes to source code as I fixed last-minute bugs, and a lot of new image files being added as I rounded up screenshots and promotional art.

Created with Gource. Music is “Hongdae” by Lukhash.

Get the game:

levelcount

Level count isn’t everything

I’m quickly approaching gold status on Iridescence, and with all foreseeable technical work finished, I’m deep in the throes of level design. Originally I had planned to ship with 100 levels, but today I decided to cut that in half and target 50 instead.

Why am I doing this?

I’ve been stuck in this stage of development for a while, actually. Slide had 16 levels when I released it, and I was intent on having significantly more for Iridescence, being as it’s going to be a commercial release and I want people to feel they’ve gotten their money’s worth. 100 seemed like a nice round number and I assumed that reaching it would be fairly straightforward.

This is the part where I was wrong. Designing puzzles is actually really hard. You want them to be challenging but still fun, subversive but not unfair, and most importantly they have to mesh with one another as a cohesive whole. On top of all that, the puzzle designer has to learn to work backwards from an interesting solution to a starting state that doesn’t make the goal obvious.

The whole process is very creatively-bound, and it’s impossible (at least for me) to sit to down and just crank out new levels up to a set quota. It’s been hard to keep a steady pace, and the constant awareness of how much more work I have in store hasn’t helped.

While considering all this, I realized that I was coming at this whole process from the wrong direction. In all my favorite puzzle games, the number of levels is irrelevant; the game goes on until it runs out of meaningful things to do, and then it stops. My number one goal in Iridescence’s design is that each level provide some way of stretching the player’s mind; whether that’s by introducing a new system, or subverting assumptions to cause misdirection. This is in direct conflict with having to fill a set number of levels. Some puzzle games are based on a small set of mechanics which are then used in levels that are more about going through the motions than finding something new each time.ย  There’s nothing inherently wrong with that, of course, but it goes against the philosophy I’ve been building Iridescence around.

In the end, I’d rather make a concise game that does what it sets out to do and nothing more, than a long game that’s full of repetition and filler.

fpdev

Hypothermia is now on itch.io!

 

A while back I made a little game called Hypothermia for Experimental Gameplay‘s “Temperature” challenge, a game jam of sorts that ran for a week during November/December 2013. It got reviewed by Indie Impressions and Indie Statik, and some guy from China did a Let’s Play of it.

Based solely on download count, it’s my most successful game thus far, but I never managed to find a hosting site for it that was a good fit, so despite it being a flash game anyone who wanted to play it had to download an archive containing the SWF and a web page. Thanks to itch.io, I now have a place to upload it without having to worry about it being blammed by people who don’t understand game jams. ;)

Play it here!

Beta release – The Heroes’ Tourney

There comes a point in the life of every creative person where you create something that feels like the culmination of your craft. It’s your magnum opus, and you’ll never make anything better.

The Heroes’ Tourney felt that way for me. It’s a “couch multiplayer” game for 2-4 players in which you try to punch your friends off of platforms or into environmental hazards.

tourney_arcade

It started in a 24 hour game jam held by SNHU, a college here in New Hampshire. Chris, Mike, and I had decided to make a local multiplayer game and had the basic groundwork up and running. At some point around 12 hours in, Chris and I woke Mike up with our laughter over the absurdity of a certain bug with the physics, and we decided to build the rest of the game around that. The rest is history.

The 24 hour deadline rolled around and our game was a smash hit, despite being nowhere near finished. About a week later, we all met up again at a game jam at NHTI and somehow decided to continue work on THT instead of creating a new game from scratch. This new version included a powerup system that added a whole new dynamic to the gameplay. We had a mini tournament during the wrap up session and it was incredibly rewarding to see other people laughing and taunting each other while they played.

I’ve done some more work on the game since then and we still plan to work on it in the future, but I think it’s finally ready to be thrust out into the world to see how it fares. You can download it here. Make sure to read the readme, and yes, controllers really are required.

PS:

Here are some action shots from our post-thanksgiving dinner tournament.

And here’s my little sister playing against my cousin’s girlfriend.